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Submitted on
December 8, 2013
Image Size
439 KB
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960×640
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Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Shutter Speed
20/1 second
Aperture
F/16.0
Focal Length
100 mm
ISO Speed
125
Date Taken
Nov 30, 2013, 2:01:34 AM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS4 Windows
Sensor Size
6mm
×
UV Chondroderella borneensis by melvynyeo UV Chondroderella borneensis by melvynyeo
Shine with 365nm UV torch light only. Taken at night in Singapore forest.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tettigon…
Insects in the family Tettigoniidae are commonly called katydids or bush-crickets. There are more than 6,400 species. Part of the suborder Ensifera, it is the only family in the superfamily Tettigonioidea. The name is derived from the genus Tettigonia, first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1748. They are also known as long-horned grasshoppers, although they are more closely related to crickets and weta than to any type of grasshopper. Many tettigoniids exhibit mimicry and camouflage, commonly with shapes and colors similar to leaves.

Tettigoniids may be distinguished from the grasshopper by the length of their filamentous antennae, which may exceed their own body length, while grasshoppers' antennae are always relatively short and thickened.
The males of tettigoniids have sound-producing organs (via stridulation) located on the hind angles of their front wings. In some species females are also capable of stridulation. The males provide a nuptial gift for the females in the form of a spermatophylax, a body attached to the males' spermatophore which is consumed by the female. The function of the spermatophylax is to increase the attachment time of the male's spermatophore and thereby increase his paternity.[2]
The eggs of tettigoniids are typically oval shaped and laid in rows on the host plant.
The diet of tettigoniids includes leaves, flowers, bark, and seeds, but many species are exclusively predatory, feeding on other insects, snails or even small vertebrates such as snakes and lizards. Some are also considered pests by commercial crop growers and are sprayed to limit growth, but population densities are usually low so a large economic impact is rare.[4] Large tettigoniids can inflict a painful bite or pinch if handled but seldom break the skin.
Some species of bush crickets are consumed by people, like the nsenene (Ruspolia baileyi) in Uganda and neighbouring areas.
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:iconlaceyjibs:
LaceyJibs Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
Looks great with the UV light, nice work! :D (Big Grin) 
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:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
Thank you! :)
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:iconchrislys24:
ChrisLys24 Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
SuperBe ! 
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:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
Thank you! :)
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:iconndrn:
NdrN Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2013
Very beautiful! ;)
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:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
Thank you! :)
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:iconsetblkyoem:
SETBLKYOEM Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Beautiful.
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:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
Thank you! :)
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:iconbeegbot:
Beegbot Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2013  Student General Artist
super AMAZING
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:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
Thank you! :)
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