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Submitted on
February 10
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2,899 (6 today)
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Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Shutter Speed
1/160 second
Aperture
F/16.0
Focal Length
100 mm
ISO Speed
250
Date Taken
Jan 17, 2014, 11:02:59 PM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS4 Windows
Sensor Size
6mm
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Treehopper with mite by melvynyeo Treehopper with mite by melvynyeo
Treehopper with damaged wing and a unfriendly mite :) Taken at night in Singapore.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treehopp…
Treehoppers (more precisely typical treehoppers to distinguish them from the Aetalionidae) and thorn bugs are members of the family Membracidae, a group of insects related to the cicadas and the leafhoppers. About 3,200 species of treehoppers in over 400 genera are known.[1] They are found on all continents except Antarctica; only three species are known from Europe.

They are best known for their enlarged and ornate pronotum, which most often resembles thorns, apparently to aid camouflage. In some species, the pronotum grows to a horn-like extension, but even more bizarre and hard-to-describe shapes are also found.

Thorn bugs, due to their unusual appearance, have long interested naturalists. Distinguishing males from females is accomplished only by looking at the male genitalia. Individual treehoppers usually live for only a few months.

The specialised pronotum (or helmet) may not be simply an expansion of the prothoracic sclerite, but a fused pair of dorsal appendages of the first thoracic segment. They may be serial homologues of insect wings, which are dorsal appendages of the second and/or third thoracic segments. Evidence for this theory includes the development of the helmet, which arises as a pair of appendages attached to each side of the dorsal prothorax by an articulation with muscles and a flexible membrane that allow it to be mobile. Also, the same genes are involved in development of the helmet and the wings.
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:iconramul:
The mite is a larva of Leptus (Erythraeidae), by the way. They have the interesting feature of boring through the more sclerotized parts of their hosts.
Reply
:icondarachusi:
darachusi Feb 23, 2014   General Artist
umm whats that red sac-like organism riding on its head? :0

(haha, you from singapore too!)
Reply
:iconnooreva:
nooreva Feb 12, 2014  Professional Photographer
I found this thing in Indonesia too
Reply
:iconquivieres:
Quivieres Feb 12, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
That mite seems unfriendly indeed, do you ever interact with the incects you photograph? Like in this case taking the mite off him? or would that damage the insects?
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
Nope, i always leave them alone no matter how cruel it might seems... unless the damage is caused by human. Forcefully remove the mite will definitely harm bith the treehopper and the mite as they are very small (mite is 1mm long). 
Reply
:iconquivieres:
Quivieres Feb 14, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
it's okay, i dont think its cruel, im glad to know now, and those are good news for the mite
Reply
:iconbaher-amin:
Baher-Amin Feb 10, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
:clap: awesome!! 
Reply
:iconnickelion:
nickelion Feb 10, 2014  New member
I love this little guy.
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