Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
September 3, 2011
Image Size
443 KB
Resolution
1000×667
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
684
Favourites
27 (who?)
Comments
4
Downloads
73
×
Treehopper and her young by melvynyeo Treehopper and her young by melvynyeo
Taken in Sarawak. These were found very near a nest of weaver ants. I had to distract the ants away to have some decent shot. The young are very small, about 1mm or less.

Eggs are laid by the female with her saw-like ovipositor in slits cut into the cambium or live tissue of stems, though some species lay eggs on top of leaves or stems. The eggs may be parasitised by wasps, such as the tiny fairyflies (Mymaridae) and Trichogrammatidae. The females of some membracid species sit over their eggs to protect them from predators and parasites, and may buzz their wings at the intruder. The females of some gregarious species work together to protect each others' eggs. In at least one species, Publilia modesta, mothers serve to attract ants when nymphs are too small to produce much honeydew. Some other species make feeding slits for the nymphs.

Like the adults, the nymphs also feed upon sap, and unlike adults, have an extensible anal tube that appears designed to deposit honeydew away from their body. The tube appears to be longer in solitary species that are rarely ant attended. It is important for sap-feeding bugs to dispose of honeydew, as otherwise it can become infected with sooty moulds. Indeed, there is evidence that one of the benefits of ants for individuals of the species Publilia concava is the ants remove the honeydew and reduce such growth.

Source [link]
Add a Comment:
 
:iconhanan109:
That's ridiculously awesome!
Reply
:iconjacketpotater:
Jacketpotater Sep 3, 2011  Student General Artist
That has got to be the weirdest thing I have ever seen. But I still love it :D
Reply
Add a Comment: