Deviant Login Shop
 Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
February 10
Image Size
298 KB
Resolution
960×640
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
996
Favourites
47 (who?)
Comments
4
Downloads
30

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Shutter Speed
1/160 second
Aperture
F/16.0
Focal Length
100 mm
ISO Speed
320
Date Taken
Jan 12, 2014, 2:29:04 AM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS4 Windows
Sensor Size
6mm
×
Sexy butt of a Caerostris sp. by melvynyeo Sexy butt of a Caerostris sp. by melvynyeo
When at rest, these spider camouflage are amazing :) Taken at night in Singapore.
Front view of another Caerostris sp. Big-Headed Bark Spider, Caerostris sp. by melvynyeo

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orb-weav…
The typical orb-weaver spiders (family Araneidae) are the most common group of builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields and forests. Their common name is taken from the round shape of this typical web, and the taxon was formerly also referred to as the Orbiculariae.

Orb-weavers have eight similar eyes, hairy or spiny legs, and no stridulating organs. The Araneidae family is cosmopolitan, including many well-known large or brightly colored garden spiders. The 3,006 species in 168 genera worldwide make Araneidae the third-largest family of spiders known (behind Salticidae and Linyphiidae).[1] The orb-weavers include over 10,000 species and make up about 25% of spider diversity.

However, orb-webs are also produced by members of other families. The large golden orb-weavers (Nephilidae) and the long-jawed orb weavers (Tetragnathidae) were formerly included in the Araneidae; they are indeed closely related to them, being part of superfamily Araneoidea. Their webs are similar to those of the typical orb-weavers, but tend to be less sophisticated and often have an irregular instead of a neat spiral arrangement of the prey-capturing threads. The cribellate or hackled orb-weavers (Uloboridae) belong to a distinct superfamily of the suborder Araneomorphae; their webs are often very sophisticated, but Uloboridae use neither venom to kill their prey, nor sticky threads in their web, and probably evolved the orb structure independently. Uloboridae are cribellate, and their threads can be recognized by the fuzzy and dull appearance, which captures prey by a velcro-like mechanism.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconhelens-serendipity:
Helens-Serendipity Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Wow... like it's looking at you too!
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2014
:)
Reply
:icontenshi-no-kanashimi:
Tenshi-no-Kanashimi Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2014
Ahaha, what a cute butt. XD It looks like some kinda fuzzy owl/bat head.
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2014
:) Thanks! :)
Reply
Add a Comment: