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August 24, 2013
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Planthopper nymph by melvynyeo Planthopper nymph by melvynyeo
What seems to be a tiny greenish thorn turns out to be a pretty looking hopper! Taken at night in Singapore.

Quote en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planthop…
A planthopper is any insect in the infraorder Fulgoromorpha within the Hemiptera. The name comes from their remarkable resemblance to leaves and other plants of their environment and from the fact that they often "hop" for quick transportation in a similar way to that of grasshoppers. However, planthoppers generally walk very slowly so as not to attract attention. Distributed worldwide, all members of this group are plant-feeders, though surprisingly few are considered pests. The infraorder contains only a single superfamily, Fulgoroidea. Fulgoroids are most reliably distinguished from the other members of the classical "Homoptera" by two features; the bifurcate ("Y"-shaped) anal vein in the forewing, and the thickened, three-segmented antennae, with a generally round or egg-shaped second segment (pedicel) that bears a fine filamentous arista.

Nymphs of many Fulgoroids produce wax from special glands on the abdominal terga and other parts of the body. These are hydrophobic and help conceal the insects. Adult females of many families also produce wax which may be used to protect eggs.

Planthoppers are often vectors for plant diseases, especially phytoplasmas which live in the phloem of plants and can be transmitted by planthoppers when feeding.

A number of extinct member of Fulgoroidea are known from the fossil record, such as the Lutetian age Emiliana from the Green River Formation in Colorado, USA.
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:iconmaryjayne530:
maryjayne530 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
whoa, this is one crazy looking insect! love it
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:iconbundleofstring:
bundleofstring Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2013
wow I've seen a lot of grasshoppers in Canada, but damn they look gorgeous in Singapore!! 
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:iconavancna:
avancna Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I know there are several homopteran fossils from the Chadronian Florissant lagerstatte in Colorado, too, including an aphid and a cicada.
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:icongmdwilcox:
gmdwilcox Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
What a lovely set of greens this one sports.
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