Shop More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
July 10
Image Size
306 KB
Resolution
960×640
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
1,396
Favourites
147 (who?)
Comments
22
Downloads
13

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Shutter Speed
1/125 second
Aperture
F/16.0
Focal Length
100 mm
ISO Speed
125
Date Taken
May 10, 2014, 1:04:15 AM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS4 Windows
Sensor Size
6mm
×
Long long antenna weevil by melvynyeo Long long antenna weevil by melvynyeo
Surprisingly, it flew rather well with such long antenna. Taken at night in Singapore.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weevil
A weevil is a type of beetle from the Curculionoidea superfamily. They are usually small, less than 6 millimetres (0.24 in), and herbivorous. There are over 60,000 species in several families, mostly in the family Curculionidae (the true weevils). Some other beetles, although not closely related, bear the name "weevil", such as the biscuit weevil (Stegobium paniceum), which belongs to the family Anobiidae.

Many weevils are damaging to crops. The grain or wheat weevil (Sitophilus granarius) damages stored grain. The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) attacks cotton crops. It lays its eggs inside cotton bolls, and the young weevils eat their way out.

Weevils are often found in dry foods including nuts and seeds, cereal and grain products, such as pancake mix. In the domestic setting, they are most likely to be observed when a bag of flour is opened. Their presence is often indicated by the granules of the infested item sticking together in strings, as if caught in a cobweb.

Because there are so many species and such diversity, the higher classification of weevils is in a state of flux. Weevils are generally divided into two major divisions, the Orthoceri or primitive weevils, and the Gonatoceri or true weevils (Curculionidae). E. C. Zimmerman proposed a third division, the Heteromorphi, for several intermediate forms.[1] Primitive weevils are distinguished by having straight antennae, while true weevils have elbowed (geniculate) antennae. The elbow occurs at the end of the scape (first antennal segment) in true weevils, and the scape is usually much longer than the other antennal segments. Some exceptions occur. Nanophyini are primitive weevils (with very long trochanters) but have long scapes and geniculate antennae. From the true weevils, Gonipterinae and Ramphus have short scapes and little or no elbow.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconraido-ehwaz:
raido-ehwaz Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Professional Photographer
It must've been hard to take a photo of something so small with such big antennae, but you did a great job!
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014
Thank you! :)
Reply
:iconmeema:
Meema Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014
Wow, those antennae are insane!
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014
Yes :)
Reply
:iconigarcia:
igarcia Featured By Owner Jul 14, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Very cool little creature.  Great, great shot Mel.
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014
Thank you! :)
Reply
:iconherofan135:
herofan135 Featured By Owner Jul 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
So amazing, can't believe they have such long antenna!
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014
Thank you! :)
Reply
:iconmarcosrodriguez:
MarcosRodriguez Featured By Owner Jul 13, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Hi, your wonderful work has been featured in the latest devPREMIUM's Weekly Macro Spotlight Vol. 124. Best regards!!
MarcosRodriguez, Curator of the Macro Gallery at devPREMIUM
:icondevpremium:
Reply
:iconmelvynyeo:
melvynyeo Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014
Thank you! :)
Reply
Add a Comment: