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Submitted on
July 24
Image Size
270 KB
Resolution
960×640
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Views
2,827
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241 (who?)
Comments
9
Downloads
31

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Shutter Speed
1/160 second
Aperture
F/16.0
Focal Length
100 mm
ISO Speed
160
Date Taken
Jun 21, 2014, 4:37:47 AM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS4 Windows
Sensor Size
6mm
×
Gecko Foot by melvynyeo Gecko Foot by melvynyeo
Always wanted to shoot the underside of a gecko foot. This is a young dead gecko found in my house....

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gecko
Gecko toes have special adaptations that allow them to adhere to most surfaces without the use of liquids or surface tension. About 60% of gecko species have adhesive toe pads; such pads have been gained and lost repeatedly over the course of gecko evolution.[14] Adhesive toepads evolved independently in about 11 different gecko lineages and were lost in at least 9 lineages.[14] The spatula-shaped setae arranged in lamellae on gecko footpads enable attractive van der Waals' forces between the β-keratin lamellae/setae/spatulae structures and the surface.[15][16] These van der Waals interactions involve no fluids; in theory, a boot made of synthetic setae would adhere as easily to the surface of the International Space Station as it would to a living-room wall, although adhesion varies with humidity.[17][18] The setae on the feet of geckos are also self-cleaning and will usually remove any clogging dirt within a few steps.[19][20] Teflon, which has very low surface energy,[21] is more difficult for geckos to adhere to than many other surfaces.

One study suggested capillary adhesion might play a role,[22] but that hypothesis has been refuted by more recent research.[17][18][23] Another study suggests that electrostatic forces may be primarily responsible.[24]

Gecko toes seem to be "double jointed", but this is a misnomer and is properly called digital hyperextension.[25] Gecko toes can hyperextend in the opposite direction from human fingers and toes. This allows them to overcome the van der Waals force by peeling their toes off surfaces from the tips inward. In essence, this peeling action alters the angle of incidence between millions of individual setae and the surface, reducing the van der Waals force. Geckos' toes operate well below their full attractive capabilities most of the time, because the margin for error is great depending upon the surface roughness, and therefore the number of setae in contact with that surface.
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:iconarkarian101:
arkarian101 Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
wonderful image 
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:icondragon-art14:
Dragon-Art14 Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2014  Student General Artist
Foot. :T
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:iconrodegas:
Rodegas Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2014
Oh no! I read your comment and you spoiled big discovery for my NOoooo!
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:icondragon-art14:
Dragon-Art14 Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2014  Student General Artist
Ehh.....okay /:3
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:iconcraziiance:
Craziiance Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2014
*high-5s screen*
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:iconplatyadmirer:
Platyadmirer Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2014  Student General Artist
Someone likes creepy crawlies almost as much as me :D although I doubt I'd ever find someone who likes to put bugs on his or her face like I do
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:iconlongingforautumn:
LongingForAutumn Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
So neat!
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:iconcasedlsk1253:
casedlsk1253 Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2014  Student General Artist
I love geckos <3 there is not a lot of people i know who will take a picture of a gecko
Reply
:iconbiohazard-89:
BIOHAZARD-89 Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Wow, that's awesome.
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