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Submitted on
July 30
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Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Shutter Speed
1/125 second
Aperture
F/16.0
Focal Length
100 mm
ISO Speed
250
Date Taken
Jul 12, 2014, 11:32:08 PM
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Adobe Photoshop CS4 Windows
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4mm
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Arctiidae Caged Cocoon by melvynyeo Arctiidae Caged Cocoon by melvynyeo
There are a few moths (Arctiinae, Yponomeutidae) here that pupate in a cage. These caterpillars use their body hairs and silk to construct a beautiful cage to pupate in :) The bottom is its discarded "skin". This one could be Cyana spp. (Arctiidae). Taken at night in Singapore.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctiida…
The Arctiidae are a large and diverse (sub)family of moths, with around 11,000 species found all over the world, including 6,000 neotropical species.[1] This group includes the groups commonly known as tiger moths (or tigers), which usually have bright colours, footmen (which are usually much drabber), lichen moths, and wasp moths. Many species have 'hairy' caterpillars which are popularly known as woolly bears or woolly worms. The scientific name refers to this (Gk. αρκτος = a bear). Caterpillars may also go by the name 'tussock moths' (more usually this refers to Lymantriidae, however). While they were historically treated as a separate family, most recent classifications place them as a subfamily within the family Erebidae.

The most distinctive feature of the family is a tymbal organ on the metathorax.[1] This organ has membranes which are vibrated to produce ultrasonic sounds. They also have thoracic tympanal organs for hearing, a trait which has a fairly broad distribution in the Lepidoptera, but the location and structure is distinctive to the family. Other distinctive traits are particular setae ('hairs') on the larvae, wing venation, and a pair of glands near the ovipositor.[1] The sounds are used in mating[2] and for defense against predators.[3] Another good distinguishing character of the family is presence of anal glands in females.
:iconherofan135:
herofan135 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Such a cool cocoon! Great shot as always! :wow:
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:iconkalhiki:
Kalhiki Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2014  Hobbyist
What the heck? That's crazy. Cool, but crazy.
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